Project Description

OVERVIEW

The best way to describe the Mercedes-Benz SL 63 AMG is a $150,000 leather-wrapped Swiss Army knife with a 518-hp rocket strapped to it. It’s fast, stylish, luxurious, and does way more than you will ever ask of it. Few cars can look this good, sound this good, or drive this good and the SL 63 is quite the jack of all trades as far as drop-top GT cars go.

 

First impressions matter and the SL 63 shines here. Slide into the comfy bucket seat (that can both heat and cool your backside) and prepare yourself for the uncanny bark of the 6.2-liter V8 under the hood as you press the fighter-jet style “Start” button on top of the transmission lever. As you pull that same lever into gear, the car glides off the line with a snarl.

 

On the move, the car feels solid, well crafted. Everything has a nice weight to it that just oozes quality. The suspension remains pliant over bad pavement without any of the shaking or flexing you’d expect in lesser convertibles. With the suspension in the default “Comfort” setting, it’s not quite like wafting along on a cloud, but the sport-tuned suspension soaks up bumps with ease. Set the suspension into “Sport” mode and nearly every trace of body roll disappears while the car still absorbs rough pavement with aplomb.

 

While it’s perfectly understandable to want to put turn up the wick on the burly V8 by switching everything to “Sport+” to extract the maximum urgency from the engine and transmission, the car might find its perfect equilibrium in “Sport” mode but with the “Comfort” suspension, which is precisely what pressing the button marked “AMG” will set things to. The SL 63’s engine will respond quickly to your inputs and invoke that beautiful V8 burble at will, without sacrificing the beautifully supple ride that Mercedes-Benzes are known for.

 

Once underway, the car feels absolutely rapid. A firm press of the throttle on a straight, dry, and empty stretch of road will never fail to impress as the car growls and flexes its muscles, hurling you towards the horizon. Should the need arise to shed your newfound speed, the massive brakes will slow you down to a more reasonable speed in a hurry. From behind the wheel, it feels like there’s nothing the SL 63 can’t do.

OVERVIEW

The best way to describe the Mercedes-Benz SL 63 AMG is a $150,000 leather-wrapped Swiss Army knife with a 518-hp rocket strapped to it. It’s fast, stylish, luxurious, and does way more than you will ever ask of it. Few cars can look this good, sound this good, or drive this good and the SL 63 is quite the jack of all trades as far as drop-top GT cars go.


First impressions matter and the SL 63 shines here. Slide into the comfy bucket seat (that can both heat and cool your backside) and prepare yourself for the uncanny bark of the 6.2-liter V8 under the hood as you press the fighter-jet style “Start” button on top of the transmission lever. As you pull that same lever into gear, the car glides off the line with a snarl.


On the move, the car feels solid, well crafted. Everything has a nice weight to it that just oozes quality. The suspension remains pliant over bad pavement without any of the shaking or flexing you’d expect in lesser convertibles. With the suspension in the default “Comfort” setting, it’s not quite like wafting along on a cloud, but the sport-tuned suspension soaks up bumps with ease. Set the suspension into “Sport” mode and nearly every trace of body roll disappears while the car still absorbs rough pavement with aplomb.


While it’s perfectly understandable to want to put turn up the wick on the burly V8 by switching everything to “Sport+” to extract the maximum urgency from the engine and transmission, the car might find its perfect equilibrium in “Sport” mode but with the “Comfort” suspension, which is precisely what pressing the button marked “AMG” will set things to. The SL 63’s engine will respond quickly to your inputs and invoke that beautiful V8 burble at will, without sacrificing the beautifully supple ride that Mercedes-Benzes are known for.


Once underway, the car feels absolutely rapid. A firm press of the throttle on a straight, dry, and empty stretch of road will never fail to impress as the car growls and flexes its muscles, hurling you towards the horizon. Should the need arise to shed your newfound speed, the massive brakes will slow you down to a more reasonable speed in a hurry. From behind the wheel, it feels like there’s nothing the SL 63 can’t do.

GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

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GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$250 per day

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A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Mercedes-Benz “SL” nomenclature dates back to 1954 with the introduction of the iconic 300SL and has carried on through to today, giving it one of the longest running continuous nameplates out there. Standing for “Sport Lightweight”, the SL range has stayed true to its roots as a 2-door, 2-seat car for that entire time. Featuring a lightweight body and pared-down interior, the 300SL was surprisingly fast due to its 3.0-liter inline-6 with 225 horsepower.


The 1960s ushered in a new generation of the SL, known colloquially as the Pagoda. Built through 1971, the Pagodas came in three variants: the 230SL, the 250SL, and the 280SL, featuring 2.3-liter, 2.5-liter, and 2.8-liter inline-6 engines, respectively. Unfortunately, due to regulations at the time, horsepower was down to 150 hp in the 230 and 250 models, and 170 hp in the 280SL.


The longest running body style for the SL debuted in 1972 and stayed in production until 1989. Mercedes really hit their mark with this look, as it stayed fresh for 17 years with just minor updates, most notably under the hood. To meet demands for more luxury, Mercedes increased the refinement and features, moving the SL away from its lightweight roots and matching the newfound mass with bigger engines and more power.


The trend towards increased opulence continued throughout the ‘90s with the R129 chassis. It was a significant modernization of the SL nameplate that paved the way for the cutting-edge technology in the SL-Class that we see today. However, the SL-Class really broke out with the fifth generation R230 chassis with debuted in 2001 and was facelifted in 2008. It was at that point that Mercedes-Benz went all-in on performance and technology as a means of providing luxury. With the introduction of AMG models, sophisticated electronics, and innovative features like a power-folding hard top, the R230 SL-Class was a strong seller for the brand, especially in the US.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Mercedes-Benz “SL” nomenclature dates back to 1954 with the introduction of the iconic 300SL and has carried on through to today, giving it one of the longest running continuous nameplates out there. Standing for “Sport Lightweight”, the SL range has stayed true to its roots as a 2-door, 2-seat car for that entire time. Featuring a lightweight body and pared-down interior, the 300SL was surprisingly fast due to its 3.0-liter inline-6 with 225 horsepower.


The 1960s ushered in a new generation of the SL, known colloquially as the Pagoda. Built through 1971, the Pagodas came in three variants: the 230SL, the 250SL, and the 280SL, featuring 2.3-liter, 2.5-liter, and 2.8-liter inline-6 engines, respectively. Unfortunately, due to regulations at the time, horsepower was down to 150 hp in the 230 and 250 models, and 170 hp in the 280SL.


The longest running body style for the SL debuted in 1972 and stayed in production until 1989. Mercedes really hit their mark with this look, as it stayed fresh for 17 years with just minor updates, most notably under the hood. To meet demands for more luxury, Mercedes increased the refinement and features, moving the SL away from its lightweight roots and matching the newfound mass with bigger engines and more power.


The trend towards increased opulence continued throughout the ‘90s with the R129 chassis. It was a significant modernization of the SL nameplate that paved the way for the cutting-edge technology in the SL-Class that we see today. However, the SL-Class really broke out with the fifth generation R230 chassis with debuted in 2001 and was facelifted in 2008. It was at that point that Mercedes-Benz went all-in on performance and technology as a means of providing luxury. With the introduction of AMG models, sophisticated electronics, and innovative features like a power-folding hard top, the R230 SL-Class was a strong seller for the brand, especially in the US.

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VEHICLES OF ALL SHAPES &
SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

VIEW COLLECTION >