2004 Honda S2000 2017-09-25T10:38:22+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

One of the hallmarks of a good sports car is that the harder you drive it, the more rewarding it becomes. Of the Honda S2000, MotorTrend said “treat the S2000 like you hate it and you’ll get the most out of it. We did and loved every minute of it.” With Honda’s team of racing engineers behind the development of the S2000, it was practically a sure thing that it would be a good drive. The overall structure of the car was designed to be incredibly rigid while keeping the weight down, and the 2.2-liter engine, which feels docile around town, doesn’t really wake up until the point after most other engines would be banging off their rev limiter. From the moment you plop yourself into the driver’s seat, it becomes crystal clear that the Honda S2000 was designed from the ground up to be as rewarding and driver-focused as possible.

Although the engine takes some work to get the most out of, the rest of the car, from the gearbox, to the brakes, to the suspension, is designed for driver enjoyment. The crisp 6-speed manual makes every shift a pleasure and helps you get the most out of the high-revving engine. The brakes offered class-leading stopping power in their day while also delivering confidence-inspiring brake feel. The tight suspension allows flat cornering while transmitting just the right amount of information to the driver through the chunky steering wheel. With each mile behind the wheel, it becomes more and more clear that the S2000 is a cohesive package that was designed for the sole purpose of having fun.

OVERVIEW

One of the hallmarks of a good sports car is that the harder you drive it, the more rewarding it becomes. Of the Honda S2000, MotorTrend said “treat the S2000 like you hate it and you’ll get the most out of it. We did and loved every minute of it.” With Honda’s team of racing engineers behind the development of the S2000, it was practically a sure thing that it would be a good drive. The overall structure of the car was designed to be incredibly rigid while keeping the weight down, and the 2.2-liter engine, which feels docile around town, doesn’t really wake up until the point after most other engines would be banging off their rev limiter. From the moment you plop yourself into the driver’s seat, it becomes crystal clear that the Honda S2000 was designed from the ground up to be as rewarding and driver-focused as possible.

Although the engine takes some work to get the most out of, the rest of the car, from the gearbox, to the brakes, to the suspension, is designed for driver enjoyment. The crisp 6-speed manual makes every shift a pleasure and helps you get the most out of the high-revving engine. The brakes offered class-leading stopping power in their day while also delivering confidence-inspiring brake feel. The tight suspension allows flat cornering while transmitting just the right amount of information to the driver through the chunky steering wheel. With each mile behind the wheel, it becomes more and more clear that the S2000 is a cohesive package that was designed for the sole purpose of having fun.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

Honda surprised the world when they rolled out a lightweight convertible concept car, dubbed the Sport Study Model (or “SSM”), in 1995. It took another four years until the production S2000 appeared in April of 1999 to celebrate Honda’s 50th anniversary. The first generation S2000 featured a high-revving 2.0-liter 4-cylinder that produced 237-bhp, making it the highest specific output of any naturally aspirated engine in the world when it debuted. The 8900-RPM redline helped the S2000 stand out amongst other drop-top sports cars like the Porsche Boxster and BMW Z3.

In 2004, the second-generation S2000 debuted with a larger 2.2-liter engine and although the extra displacement didn’t bring any additional horsepower, it bumped up the torque by 9 lb-ft and made the powerband slightly more accessible. Unfortunately, the tradeoff was that the new FA22 engine only revved out to 8000 RPM now, instead of the truly magical almost 9000 RPM redline available in the first generation. Still though, the second generation brought with it other improvements throughout the S2000 to further stiffen the chassis while also increasing its ease of use and drivability.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

Honda surprised the world when they rolled out a lightweight convertible concept car, dubbed the Sport Study Model (or “SSM”), in 1995. It took another four years until the production S2000 appeared in April of 1999 to celebrate Honda’s 50th anniversary. The first generation S2000 featured a high-revving 2.0-liter 4-cylinder that produced 237-bhp, making it the highest specific output of any naturally aspirated engine in the world when it debuted. The 8900-RPM redline helped the S2000 stand out amongst other drop-top sports cars like the Porsche Boxster and BMW Z3.

In 2004, the second-generation S2000 debuted with a larger 2.2-liter engine and although the extra displacement didn’t bring any additional horsepower, it bumped up the torque by 9 lb-ft and made the powerband slightly more accessible. Unfortunately, the tradeoff was that the new FA22 engine only revved out to 8000 RPM now, instead of the truly magical almost 9000 RPM redline available in the first generation. Still though, the second generation brought with it other improvements throughout the S2000 to further stiffen the chassis while also increasing its ease of use and drivability.

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SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

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