1977 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz 2017-07-03T08:14:07+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

What do you get when you combine a magic carpet, your favorite lounge chair, and the Soul Train? We’re not sure either, but the 1978 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz is probably the closest you’re going to get. One look at this beast and it’s clear that the funk is alive and well. Hop inside and you’ll immediately begin channeling your inner George Clinton. Everywhere you look, there’s soft, supple leather, wood grain, and chrome. The Eldorado is about as close as you’ll get to driving your living room.

Fire up the big V8 and it quickly settles into a gentle rumble. Slide the column shifter into Drive and the Eldorado just glides away off the line in total comfort and style. The cushy suspension soaks up all of the bumps and cracks in the road and lets you groove on in style.

OVERVIEW

What do you get when you combine a magic carpet, your favorite lounge chair, and the Soul Train? We’re not sure either, but the 1978 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz is probably the closest you’re going to get. One look at this beast and it’s clear that the funk is alive and well. Hop inside and you’ll immediately begin channeling your inner George Clinton. Everywhere you look, there’s soft, supple leather, wood grain, and chrome. The Eldorado is about as close as you’ll get to driving your living room.

Fire up the big V8 and it quickly settles into a gentle rumble. Slide the column shifter into Drive and the Eldorado just glides away off the line in total comfort and style. The cushy suspension soaks up all of the bumps and cracks in the road and lets you groove on in style.

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GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$100 PER DAY

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A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

Despite no longer being used today, the Eldorado is one of Cadillac’s most iconic models. Having debuted in 1953, the Eldorado was designed by the legendary Harley Earl and represented Cadillac as a halo vehicle at the time by offering an elegant convertible top, over-the-top styling, and a glut of luxuries. As such, it carried a much higher base price than the Series 62 it was based upon and represented less than 1% of Cadillac’s sales volume that year.

While the 1953 Eldorado was a unique model, the 1954 model shared the bulk of its body panels with other Cadillac models. The set the Eldorado apart from the rest of Cadillac’s lineup largely came down to superficial trim pieces and materials. This allowed Cadillac to sell four times as many Eldorados in 1954 compared to 1953, and sales continued to increase from there. In 1956, a hardtop coupe was introduced as the Eldorado Seville, while the convertible was renamed as the Eldorado Biarritz.

For 1957, the Eldorado was again redesigned and took on its most iconic form to date. While style was certainly a priority for Harley Earl and his team of designers, the Eldorado was now one of the most luxurious cars on the road, and with a price tag to match. The Brougham trim was an engineering marvel at the time but was priced higher than a Rolls Royce of the era. It featured exorbitant options like self-leveling air suspension, lamb-skin carpeting and perfume atomizers, thus establishing Cadillac as a truly world-class brand. The mack-daddy of the Eldorado Brougham came out in 1959. The bodies were now manufactured by Pininfarina in Turin, Italy and it took Cadillac’s famous tail-fins to the max.

As the 1960’s came to a close, Cadillac introduced their largest engine yet, a massive 500 cubic inch (8.2 liter) V8 that produced 400 horsepower and a massive 550 lb-ft of torque. While such a large engine might sound like overkill, the Eldorado was no small car. Weighing well over two tons and loaded to the gills with luxury, Cadillacs of this era were large and in charge.

As the gas crisis of the late 1970’s came into full swing, Cadillac began downsizing their engines, offering a still massive 7.0-liter V8 but now down to 180 horsepower. Despite the smaller engine, the Eldorado still offered plenty of luxury.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

Despite no longer being used today, the Eldorado is one of Cadillac’s most iconic models. Having debuted in 1953, the Eldorado was designed by the legendary Harley Earl and represented Cadillac as a halo vehicle at the time by offering an elegant convertible top, over-the-top styling, and a glut of luxuries. As such, it carried a much higher base price than the Series 62 it was based upon and represented less than 1% of Cadillac’s sales volume that year.

While the 1953 Eldorado was a unique model, the 1954 model shared the bulk of its body panels with other Cadillac models. The set the Eldorado apart from the rest of Cadillac’s lineup largely came down to superficial trim pieces and materials. This allowed Cadillac to sell four times as many Eldorados in 1954 compared to 1953, and sales continued to increase from there. In 1956, a hardtop coupe was introduced as the Eldorado Seville, while the convertible was renamed as the Eldorado Biarritz.

For 1957, the Eldorado was again redesigned and took on its most iconic form to date. While style was certainly a priority for Harley Earl and his team of designers, the Eldorado was now one of the most luxurious cars on the road, and with a price tag to match. The Brougham trim was an engineering marvel at the time but was priced higher than a Rolls Royce of the era. It featured exorbitant options like self-leveling air suspension, lamb-skin carpeting and perfume atomizers, thus establishing Cadillac as a truly world-class brand. The mack-daddy of the Eldorado Brougham came out in 1959. The bodies were now manufactured by Pininfarina in Turin, Italy and it took Cadillac’s famous tail-fins to the max.

As the 1960’s came to a close, Cadillac introduced their largest engine yet, a massive 500 cubic inch (8.2 liter) V8 that produced 400 horsepower and a massive 550 lb-ft of torque. While such a large engine might sound like overkill, the Eldorado was no small car. Weighing well over two tons and loaded to the gills with luxury, Cadillacs of this era were large and in charge.

As the gas crisis of the late 1970’s came into full swing, Cadillac began downsizing their engines, offering a still massive 7.0-liter V8 but now down to 180 horsepower. Despite the smaller engine, the Eldorado still offered plenty of luxury.

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VEHICLES OF ALL SHAPES &
SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

VIEW COLLECTION >