1973 Ford Bronco 2017-06-28T12:32:25+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

This bright yellow 1973 Ford Bronco may look like a Banana Boat but it drives like a tank. With the large tires and a range of 4WD options, you can take this truck anywhere. Updated with fresh suspension and a kid-friendly jump seat in the back, this golden stallion begs to be driven. Just find your favorite back road, fire up the 302 cubic inch V8 and enjoy the ride.

On those beautiful Minnesota summer days, you can even take the top off and enjoy the wind in your hair as you take it for a cruise around the lake. There’s plenty of room for kids, a cooler and all the beach gear you need. Everything about the Bronco just screams “fun in the sun”. Maybe it’s the bright yellow paint, the round, doe-eyed headlights, or the comfy, relaxed driving position but as you drive it, you get the feeling that if the Bronco was a living creature, it would be smiling, having just as much fun as you are.

Sitting high atop the soft velour-trimmed driver’s seat, holding the thin-rimmed steering wheel in your hands, you have a very unique view over the hood, which is flanked by rising crests above the wheel arches and culminating in softly pointed fins above the headlights. It’s a view you won’t soon forget. The tall, upright seating position and commanding view can at first make the Bronco feel like a giant of a truck to drive but being able to immediately place the front corners of the truck with those tipped, protruding fenders shrinks the vehicle around you, reassuring you that you can drive this thing anywhere.

Despite the new shocks and rumbling V8, the Bronco does provide a slightly agricultural driving experience. Although the engine makes all the right noises, it’s just as suited to being a lumbering cruiser in the Bronco as it is as a stoplight racer in the Mustang. That being said, this engine is also one heck of a workhorse. It’ll start right up reliably and never leave you stranded. Although this isn’t a vehicle one should look to for the utmost in fuel economy, the Bronco does feature two fuel tanks to make sure you always have enough fuel reserves to get you where you need to go.

This ’73 Bronco is bright, loud, and full of character. In a sense, it’s more like a big, yellow puppy or a real life Tonka truck than an actual bucking bronco. It likes to get outside and is equally at home running through a big open field, playing in the mud, or relaxing at the beach. It’s just happy to be going for a ride.

OVERVIEW

This bright yellow 1973 Ford Bronco may look like a Banana Boat but it drives like a tank. With the large tires and a range of 4WD options, you can take this truck anywhere. Updated with fresh suspension and a kid-friendly jump seat in the back, this golden stallion begs to be driven. Just find your favorite back road, fire up the 302 cubic inch V8 and enjoy the ride.

On those beautiful Minnesota summer days, you can even take the top off and enjoy the wind in your hair as you take it for a cruise around the lake. There’s plenty of room for kids, a cooler and all the beach gear you need. Everything about the Bronco just screams “fun in the sun”. Maybe it’s the bright yellow paint, the round, doe-eyed headlights, or the comfy, relaxed driving position but as you drive it, you get the feeling that if the Bronco was a living creature, it would be smiling, having just as much fun as you are.

Sitting high atop the soft velour-trimmed driver’s seat, holding the thin-rimmed steering wheel in your hands, you have a very unique view over the hood, which is flanked by rising crests above the wheel arches and culminating in softly pointed fins above the headlights. It’s a view you won’t soon forget. The tall, upright seating position and commanding view can at first make the Bronco feel like a giant of a truck to drive but being able to immediately place the front corners of the truck with those tipped, protruding fenders shrinks the vehicle around you, reassuring you that you can drive this thing anywhere.

Despite the new shocks and rumbling V8, the Bronco does provide a slightly agricultural driving experience. Although the engine makes all the right noises, it’s just as suited to being a lumbering cruiser in the Bronco as it is as a stoplight racer in the Mustang. That being said, this engine is also one heck of a workhorse. It’ll start right up reliably and never leave you stranded. Although this isn’t a vehicle one should look to for the utmost in fuel economy, the Bronco does feature two fuel tanks to make sure you always have enough fuel reserves to get you where you need to go.

This ’73 Bronco is bright, loud, and full of character. In a sense, it’s more like a big, yellow puppy or a real life Tonka truck than an actual bucking bronco. It likes to get outside and is equally at home running through a big open field, playing in the mud, or relaxing at the beach. It’s just happy to be going for a ride.

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A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

While most people associate the Bronco nameplate with OJ Simpson and his desperate run from the police, the first generation Ford Bronco, built from 1966 until 1977 is definitely the most iconic. Put into production during Ford’s hey-day alongside the Mustang, the Bronco was to off-roaders what the Mustang was to those looking for a sports car. In fact, the Bronco and Mustang were both designed by Donald Frey and developed by Lee Iacocca. Both vehicles represented new frontiers at Ford.

But while the Bronco’s short wheelbase made it agile and maneuverable off-road, it was less ideal for towing, despite the fact that the later models that utilized either a 289 or 302 cubic inch V8 offered plenty of grunt. Designed from scratch, the Bronco bucked the trend at the time of dipping into other parts bins on the production line. Instead, the frame, suspension, and body were completely original to the Bronco. Over time, the Bronco gained more options and bigger engines, but was quickly outsold by vehicles like the Chevy Blazer, International Scout, and Jeep Cherokee as they came out. Still, the Bronco remains, as arguably the most iconic of the era, combining looks, utility, and capability better than nearly anything else at the time.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

While most people associate the Bronco nameplate with OJ Simpson and his desperate run from the police, the first generation Ford Bronco, built from 1966 until 1977 is definitely the most iconic. Put into production during Ford’s hey-day alongside the Mustang, the Bronco was to off-roaders what the Mustang was to those looking for a sports car. In fact, the Bronco and Mustang were both designed by Donald Frey and developed by Lee Iacocca. Both vehicles represented new frontiers at Ford.

But while the Bronco’s short wheelbase made it agile and maneuverable off-road, it was less ideal for towing, despite the fact that the later models that utilized either a 289 or 302 cubic inch V8 offered plenty of grunt. Designed from scratch, the Bronco bucked the trend at the time of dipping into other parts bins on the production line. Instead, the frame, suspension, and body were completely original to the Bronco. Over time, the Bronco gained more options and bigger engines, but was quickly outsold by vehicles like the Chevy Blazer, International Scout, and Jeep Cherokee as they came out. Still, the Bronco remains, as arguably the most iconic of the era, combining looks, utility, and capability better than nearly anything else at the time.

WORD ON THE STREET

“Today the Bronco’s legacy is as one of the progenitors of the compact SUV craze that hit in full force in the 1990s and later. And while many models are more capable off road, few can do it with such style.”

Unknown, Hagerty

“Everything you lay your hand upon serves a specific intent or purpose. The amount of metal used in the first-generation models makes them more trustworthy, easier to restore, and more appealing on a deeper level than the newer ones. It recalls an era of long-lasting craftsmanship in vehicles.”

Jonathan Ward, ICON 4x4

“I think there is a nice simplicity to the design—there’s nothing frivolous about it. There’s a friendliness to the Bronco that I think people are attracted to. When you look at that first generation, that sheetmetal lasted for 11 years. The only changes we made were for regulations. I think the Bronco remained quite endearing as a result.”

Moray Callum, Ford VP of Design

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