1972 Ford Ranchero 2017-09-25T14:11:16+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

Business in the front, party in the back. Some people say that the Ford Ranchero first spawned this phrase providing the inspiration for the hairstyle we all love to hate. However, the opposite is probably truer. The Ranchero is party in the front, party in the back. Some say the original pickup car, the Ranchero, answered the question that nobody asked. Sometimes, however, people don’t know what they want because the Ranchero was hugely successful. Heck, if it was one of Elvis Presley’s favorite cars it has to be good, right?

If you haven’t owned or driven a Ranchero, you probably don’t get it. Yet, after spending some time in one it makes complete sense. The Ranchero is one of few vehicles that can haul a full load of plants from the garden center, take you on a spirited drive through the countryside and have you running for pink slips at the drag slip in the same day.

Glancing at this 1972 Ranchero GT from a distance, you can’t help but admire the paint. It’s so ugly it’s cool. Only 1972 could make brown and orange look good.   Moving inside, as you sink down into the comfy, tan vinyl bench seat and stare out over the long hood it feels like you’re about to drive a couch straight out of your grandma’s living room. Yet, the big hood scoop on the hood reminds you that you are in a gritty muscle car – err truck — err pickup car.

The thin-rimmed steering wheel feels delicate but well weighted in your hands and the whole cockpit is designed to provide all the information you’ll need with the auxiliary gauges pointed towards the driver. Just twist the key and the Ranchero starts right up with an intoxicating roar. After a few moments, the engine settles into a gentle, burbling idle which resonates through the custom exhaust. Pull the column shifter into gear and you’re off to the races.

On the road the Ranchero feels surprisingly modern in its ability to keep up with traffic. Should your heart desire, the Ranchero can also show a bit of its hooligan side; plenty capable of spinning up its wheels and scorching the pavement as it surges down the road. With the soundtrack of the V8 ringing in your ears, it’s hard not to be tempted to put your foot down hard on the accelerator and feel the rear of the car squat slightly as it takes off. Of course, if you choose to be more responsible, the Ranchero is perfectly happy just cruising down the street, looking good.

The Ranchero is truly an automotive paradox. It’s a guilty pleasure. It’s like the mullet we all had in the 80’s, but refuse to admit. Consider giving the automotive mullet a try. You just might like it.

OVERVIEW

Business in the front, party in the back. Some people say that the Ford Ranchero first spawned this phrase providing the inspiration for the hairstyle we all love to hate. However, the opposite is probably truer. The Ranchero is party in the front, party in the back. Some say the original pickup car, the Ranchero, answered the question that nobody asked. Sometimes, however, people don’t know what they want because the Ranchero was hugely successful. Heck, if it was one of Elvis Presley’s favorite cars it has to be good, right?

If you haven’t owned or driven a Ranchero, you probably don’t get it. Yet, after spending some time in one it makes complete sense. The Ranchero is one of few vehicles that can haul a full load of plants from the garden center, take you on a spirited drive through the countryside and have you running for pink slips at the drag slip in the same day.

Glancing at this 1972 Ranchero GT from a distance, you can’t help but admire the paint. It’s so ugly it’s cool. Only 1972 could make brown and orange look good.   Moving inside, as you sink down into the comfy, tan vinyl bench seat and stare out over the long hood it feels like you’re about to drive a couch straight out of your grandma’s living room. Yet, the big hood scoop on the hood reminds you that you are in a gritty muscle car – err truck — err pickup car.

The thin-rimmed steering wheel feels delicate but well weighted in your hands and the whole cockpit is designed to provide all the information you’ll need with the auxiliary gauges pointed towards the driver. Just twist the key and the Ranchero starts right up with an intoxicating roar. After a few moments, the engine settles into a gentle, burbling idle which resonates through the custom exhaust. Pull the column shifter into gear and you’re off to the races.

On the road the Ranchero feels surprisingly modern in its ability to keep up with traffic. Should your heart desire, the Ranchero can also show a bit of its hooligan side; plenty capable of spinning up its wheels and scorching the pavement as it surges down the road. With the soundtrack of the V8 ringing in your ears, it’s hard not to be tempted to put your foot down hard on the accelerator and feel the rear of the car squat slightly as it takes off. Of course, if you choose to be more responsible, the Ranchero is perfectly happy just cruising down the street, looking good.

The Ranchero is truly an automotive paradox. It’s a guilty pleasure. It’s like the mullet we all had in the 80’s, but refuse to admit. Consider giving the automotive mullet a try. You just might like it.

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GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$150 PER DAY

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A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The original pickup car, the Ford Ranchero debuted in December of 1956. It was the first postwar American vehicle adapted from a popular sedan at the factory, combining the sleek good looks of a sedan with the capabilities of a light duty pickup.   500,000 Rancheros were produced between 1957 and 1979 with seven body style changes along the way.

In 1972 Ford made a major body change to the Ranchero, commonly referred to as the Torino design or “fish mouth” Ranchero. In this particular Ranchero GT, power comes from a 6.6-liter V8 mated to its original C-6 automatic transmission. Features unique to the GT include a functional performance hood scoop and wider G70 series tyres on Magnum 500 road wheels The inside features high-back bucket seats and a deluxe three-spoke steering wheel complementing a performance cluster of instruments.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The original pickup car, the Ford Ranchero debuted in December of 1956. It was the first postwar American vehicle adapted from a popular sedan at the factory, combining the sleek good looks of a sedan with the capabilities of a light duty pickup.   500,000 Rancheros were produced between 1957 and 1979 with seven body style changes along the way.

In 1972 Ford made a major body change to the Ranchero, commonly referred to as the Torino design or “fish mouth” Ranchero. In this particular Ranchero GT, power comes from a 6.6-liter V8 mated to its original C-6 automatic transmission. Features unique to the GT include a functional performance hood scoop and wider G70 series tyres on Magnum 500 road wheels The inside features high-back bucket seats and a deluxe three-spoke steering wheel complementing a performance cluster of instruments.

WORD ON THE STREET

“We’ve been longtime fans of the old Chevrolet El Camino but automotive history proves that Ford beat GM in building and introducing a compact ute to the North American market. The Ford Ranchero, like the El Camino, combined the utility of a pickup truck with a large coupe body style. While not to everyone’s taste, it offered plenty of practical conveniences for owners who didn’t necessarily want a pickup but that wanted some useful loading space.”

Jay Traugott, Carbuzz

“It’s been more than 30 years since Ford’s Ranchero departed from Blue Oval showrooms, and well over two decades since car-based pickup trucks vanished from the mainstream in the U.S. While unit-body, auto-based pickups are a common sight on the continents south of the equator, America gradually shifted away from them altogether. Which is a shame, really, since people are now using their trucks more like cars than ever before. Of course, some buyers were decades ahead of the curve; they not only used their trucks like cars, but also decked them out in all of the same muscle-era fineries and fripperies.”

Jeff Koch, Hemmings

“Back in ’57, when the first Ranchero showed up at Motor Trend’s door on Hollywood Boulevard, there was a universal feeling among our staff and onlookers that it was probably another Barris Kustom creation. Conjectures ranged from a “station wagon sans its top” to a “passenger car with a pickup bed” to some sort of a “customized truck.”

Actually, the Ranchero was a Ranch Wagon with the top sheared off aft of the cabin. Powerplant, running gear, interior appointments were all the same. I wrote at the time that it had the personal feel of the T-Bird, the comfort of a sedan, moderate-to-good power, and the load-carrying of a small pickup. I also predicted (no great feat!) that it would be copied.”

Walt Woron, Motor Trend

VEHICLES OF ALL SHAPES &
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VEHICLES OF ALL SHAPES &
SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

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