1966 Jaguar XKE 2017-08-31T11:06:47+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

Few cars are as gorgeous or iconic as the Series I Jaguar XKE, also commonly known as the E-Type. While the sleek roadster shape gives the appearance of speed, even when standing still, it was also laboriously designed to be aerodynamic and stable at speed. It is truly the perfect blend of form meeting function. Stare at it long enough and it’s easy to see that the XKE takes many of its design cues from the C- and D-Type Jaguars that raced extensively at Le Mans and elsewhere around the world in the ‘50s. That’s not to say that the XKE is purely superficial, however. Much of the drivetrain and inner workings are direct descendants of Jaguar’s very successful race cars, from the silky smooth and sonorous straight-6 engine to the suspension design and inboard brakes.

On the road, the XKE is pure drop-top bliss. There are few cars that are more enjoyable or rewarding to drive on a warm, sunny day. Rowing through the gears and feeling the elegant wood-rimmed steering wheel in your hands, it’s easy to imagine yourself as Frank Sinatra or even Jackie Stewart, out for a casual drive. There’s a quiet confidence to these cars. When you’re behind the wheel of an E-Type, you don’t have to prove anything to anyone. From the minute you settle into the leather-lined bucket seat, you feel lighter, stronger, and better looking.

OVERVIEW

Few cars are as gorgeous or iconic as the Series I Jaguar XKE, also commonly known as the E-Type. While the sleek roadster shape gives the appearance of speed, even when standing still, it was also laboriously designed to be aerodynamic and stable at speed. It is truly the perfect blend of form meeting function. Stare at it long enough and it’s easy to see that the XKE takes many of its design cues from the C- and D-Type Jaguars that raced extensively at Le Mans and elsewhere around the world in the ‘50s. That’s not to say that the XKE is purely superficial, however. Much of the drivetrain and inner workings are direct descendants of Jaguar’s very successful race cars, from the silky smooth and sonorous straight-6 engine to the suspension design and inboard brakes.

On the road, the XKE is pure drop-top bliss. There are few cars that are more enjoyable or rewarding to drive on a warm, sunny day. Rowing through the gears and feeling the elegant wood-rimmed steering wheel in your hands, it’s easy to imagine yourself as Frank Sinatra or even Jackie Stewart, out for a casual drive. There’s a quiet confidence to these cars. When you’re behind the wheel of an E-Type, you don’t have to prove anything to anyone. From the minute you settle into the leather-lined bucket seat, you feel lighter, stronger, and better looking.

GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

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GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$700 PER DAY

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A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Series I Jaguar XKE is often seen as a high point for the British automaker. Hot on the heals of a successful decade of racing with the C- and D-Types, Jaguar channeled that energy into their street car program at the end of the 1950’s, penning what is now considered one of their most iconic designs: the E-Type. Taking a number of styling cues from their race cars, Jaguar took the world by storm with the unveiling of the XKE. It was quickly lavished with positive reviews and became a must-have item for celebrities and the elite.

Over its 14-year production run, the Jaguar E-Type went through several iterations, mostly as a reaction various rules and regulations. The Series I cars are widely considered to be the purest form of the E-Type, however, with the later Series II and Series III cars gaining weight and visual bulk in the form of federally-mandated safety bumpers and other sacrifices for safety. While the original 3.8L inline-6 was taken directly from the D-Type race car, later cars received a friendlier and more powerful 4.2L inline-6 that serviced the E-Types through the early ‘70s when it was replaced by a tidy 5.3L V12. Unfortunately, that extra power was needed to combat the bloat of ‘70s-era safety regulations such as heavy crash structures and power-robbing emissions equipment. Still, the memory of the E-Type carries on at Jaguar today and many influences can be seen in the modern F-Type that prominently serves as the company’s halo car.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Series I Jaguar XKE is often seen as a high point for the British automaker. Hot on the heals of a successful decade of racing with the C- and D-Types, Jaguar channeled that energy into their street car program at the end of the 1950’s, penning what is now considered one of their most iconic designs: the E-Type. Taking a number of styling cues from their race cars, Jaguar took the world by storm with the unveiling of the XKE. It was quickly lavished with positive reviews and became a must-have item for celebrities and the elite.

Over its 14-year production run, the Jaguar E-Type went through several iterations, mostly as a reaction various rules and regulations. The Series I cars are widely considered to be the purest form of the E-Type, however, with the later Series II and Series III cars gaining weight and visual bulk in the form of federally-mandated safety bumpers and other sacrifices for safety. While the original 3.8L inline-6 was taken directly from the D-Type race car, later cars received a friendlier and more powerful 4.2L inline-6 that serviced the E-Types through the early ‘70s when it was replaced by a tidy 5.3L V12. Unfortunately, that extra power was needed to combat the bloat of ‘70s-era safety regulations such as heavy crash structures and power-robbing emissions equipment. Still, the memory of the E-Type carries on at Jaguar today and many influences can be seen in the modern F-Type that prominently serves as the company’s halo car.

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SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

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