1966 Ford Thunderbird 2017-07-03T08:24:42+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

The Ford Thunderbird is one of those vehicles that has had a bit of a tumultuous life. When it first debuted in 1955, it was aimed squarely at the Corvette; however, the Thunderbird was far less sporty. Instead, it was billed as a “personal luxury car” that was more focused on being comfortable and easy to drive. Still, the Thunderbird outsold the Corvette by a landslide over its first few years in production. As a relatively small, powerful two-seater, the Thunderbird towed the line between the sport and luxury cars well.

Happy with the success of the first generation Thunderbird, Ford felt it could improve upon the platform and thusly redesigned the Thunderbird completely for 1958. This meant adding rear seats, more power and more refinement. After another three years of impressive sales, the third generation hit the streets in 1961 and it was immediately an icon, being used as the pace car at the 1961 Indy 500 as well as being featured prominently in John F Kennedy’s inaugural parade.

Like clockwork, the Thunderbird was redesigned again just three years later, but keeping the same 390 cubic inch V8 with 300 horsepower that came standard in the previous generation. Again, the new Thunderbird debuted as a huge success, selling over 92,000 models in 1964 and marking a 50% improvement over the 1963 model year. By the time the fourth generation came to an end in 1966, the standard V8 was producing 315 horsepower. Ford also produced the Thunderbird with a bigger 428 cubic inch V8 that produced 345 horsepower in 1966. The ’66 Thunderbird was also featured prominently on screen in movies like Thelma and Louise, The Outsiders, and Wild At Heart.

From there, the Thunderbird line began to expand past coupes and convertibles, offering a four-door model in 1967. Future models lost their swoopy, rounded styling, in favor of a more chiseled, muscular look. As the 1970’s came to a close, the Thunderbird appeared to be a far cry from its original sporty roots. The convertible top was long gone and the styling languished in malaise era blandness. Unfortunately, the Thunderbird’s continuous production run came to an end in 1997, after 42 years in production. Not wanting to end the Thunderbird legacy at its darkest age, Ford revived the name in 2002 as a throw-back to the original 1955 model. Offered in bright colors with retro styling and only as a two-seat convertible, the new 2002 Thunderbird model delivered on many of the promises of the original model, but failed to make much of an impact over the five years it was on sale.

OVERVIEW

The Ford Thunderbird is one of those vehicles that has had a bit of a tumultuous life. When it first debuted in 1955, it was aimed squarely at the Corvette; however, the Thunderbird was far less sporty. Instead, it was billed as a “personal luxury car” that was more focused on being comfortable and easy to drive. Still, the Thunderbird outsold the Corvette by a landslide over its first few years in production. As a relatively small, powerful two-seater, the Thunderbird towed the line between the sport and luxury cars well.

Happy with the success of the first generation Thunderbird, Ford felt it could improve upon the platform and thusly redesigned the Thunderbird completely for 1958. This meant adding rear seats, more power and more refinement. After another three years of impressive sales, the third generation hit the streets in 1961 and it was immediately an icon, being used as the pace car at the 1961 Indy 500 as well as being featured prominently in John F Kennedy’s inaugural parade.

Like clockwork, the Thunderbird was redesigned again just three years later, but keeping the same 390 cubic inch V8 with 300 horsepower that came standard in the previous generation. Again, the new Thunderbird debuted as a huge success, selling over 92,000 models in 1964 and marking a 50% improvement over the 1963 model year. By the time the fourth generation came to an end in 1966, the standard V8 was producing 315 horsepower. Ford also produced the Thunderbird with a bigger 428 cubic inch V8 that produced 345 horsepower in 1966. The ’66 Thunderbird was also featured prominently on screen in movies like Thelma and Louise, The Outsiders, and Wild At Heart.

From there, the Thunderbird line began to expand past coupes and convertibles, offering a four-door model in 1967. Future models lost their swoopy, rounded styling, in favor of a more chiseled, muscular look. As the 1970’s came to a close, the Thunderbird appeared to be a far cry from its original sporty roots. The convertible top was long gone and the styling languished in malaise era blandness. Unfortunately, the Thunderbird’s continuous production run came to an end in 1997, after 42 years in production. Not wanting to end the Thunderbird legacy at its darkest age, Ford revived the name in 2002 as a throw-back to the original 1955 model. Offered in bright colors with retro styling and only as a two-seat convertible, the new 2002 Thunderbird model delivered on many of the promises of the original model, but failed to make much of an impact over the five years it was on sale.

GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$250 PER DAY

BOOK NOW >

GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$250 PER DAY

BOOK NOW >

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Ford Thunderbird is one of those vehicles that has had a bit of a tumultuous life. When it first debuted in 1955, it was aimed squarely at the Corvette; however, the Thunderbird was far less sporty. Instead, it was billed as a “personal luxury car” that was more focused on being comfortable and easy to drive. Still, the Thunderbird outsold the Corvette by a landslide over its first few years in production. As a relatively small, powerful two-seater, the Thunderbird towed the line between the sport and luxury cars well.

Happy with the success of the first generation Thunderbird, Ford felt it could improve upon the platform and thusly redesigned the Thunderbird completely for 1958. This meant adding rear seats, more power and more refinement. After another three years of impressive sales, the third generation hit the streets in 1961 and it was immediately an icon, being used as the pace car at the 1961 Indy 500 as well as being featured prominently in John F Kennedy’s inaugural parade.

Like clockwork, the Thunderbird was redesigned again just three years later, but keeping the same 390 cubic inch V8 with 300 horsepower that came standard in the previous generation. Again, the new Thunderbird debuted as a huge success, selling over 92,000 models in 1964 and marking a 50% improvement over the 1963 model year. By the time the fourth generation came to an end in 1966, the standard V8 was producing 315 horsepower. Ford also produced the Thunderbird with a bigger 428 cubic inch V8 that produced 345 horsepower in 1966. The ’66 Thunderbird was also featured prominently on screen in movies like Thelma and Louise, The Outsiders, and Wild At Heart.

From there, the Thunderbird line began to expand past coupes and convertibles, offering a four-door model in 1967. Future models lost their swoopy, rounded styling, in favor of a more chiseled, muscular look. As the 1970’s came to a close, the Thunderbird appeared to be a far cry from its original sporty roots. The convertible top was long gone and the styling languished in malaise era blandness. Unfortunately, the Thunderbird’s continuous production run came to an end in 1997, after 42 years in production. Not wanting to end the Thunderbird legacy at its darkest age, Ford revived the name in 2002 as a throw-back to the original 1955 model. Offered in bright colors with retro styling and only as a two-seat convertible, the new 2002 Thunderbird model delivered on many of the promises of the original model, but failed to make much of an impact over the five years it was on sale.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Ford Thunderbird is one of those vehicles that has had a bit of a tumultuous life. When it first debuted in 1955, it was aimed squarely at the Corvette; however, the Thunderbird was far less sporty. Instead, it was billed as a “personal luxury car” that was more focused on being comfortable and easy to drive. Still, the Thunderbird outsold the Corvette by a landslide over its first few years in production. As a relatively small, powerful two-seater, the Thunderbird towed the line between the sport and luxury cars well.

Happy with the success of the first generation Thunderbird, Ford felt it could improve upon the platform and thusly redesigned the Thunderbird completely for 1958. This meant adding rear seats, more power and more refinement. After another three years of impressive sales, the third generation hit the streets in 1961 and it was immediately an icon, being used as the pace car at the 1961 Indy 500 as well as being featured prominently in John F Kennedy’s inaugural parade.

Like clockwork, the Thunderbird was redesigned again just three years later, but keeping the same 390 cubic inch V8 with 300 horsepower that came standard in the previous generation. Again, the new Thunderbird debuted as a huge success, selling over 92,000 models in 1964 and marking a 50% improvement over the 1963 model year. By the time the fourth generation came to an end in 1966, the standard V8 was producing 315 horsepower. Ford also produced the Thunderbird with a bigger 428 cubic inch V8 that produced 345 horsepower in 1966. The ’66 Thunderbird was also featured prominently on screen in movies like Thelma and Louise, The Outsiders, and Wild At Heart.

From there, the Thunderbird line began to expand past coupes and convertibles, offering a four-door model in 1967. Future models lost their swoopy, rounded styling, in favor of a more chiseled, muscular look. As the 1970’s came to a close, the Thunderbird appeared to be a far cry from its original sporty roots. The convertible top was long gone and the styling languished in malaise era blandness. Unfortunately, the Thunderbird’s continuous production run came to an end in 1997, after 42 years in production. Not wanting to end the Thunderbird legacy at its darkest age, Ford revived the name in 2002 as a throw-back to the original 1955 model. Offered in bright colors with retro styling and only as a two-seat convertible, the new 2002 Thunderbird model delivered on many of the promises of the original model, but failed to make much of an impact over the five years it was on sale.

VEHICLES OF ALL SHAPES &
SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

VIEW COLLECTION >

VEHICLES OF ALL SHAPES &
SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

VIEW COLLECTION >