1965 Shelby Cobra 2017-08-31T11:05:45+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

If you’ve ever wondered what it was like to drive a vintage, 1960’s race car, this is about as close as you’ll get. This Factory Five Racing (FFR) Mk III Cobra is about as visceral as it gets. Wind in your hair, bugs in your teeth, rocks pinging off the very loud exhaust pipes running down the side of the car, just inches from your left thigh. It’s a rough and tumble kind of car, built for the war heroes and tough guys that dared to try and tame it around a race track.

With this FFR kit though, it runs the more modern 5.0-liter engine that Vanilla Ice made famous in “Ice, Ice Baby”. Sure, it’s not 100% historically accurate, but it’s got plenty of juice to squeeze and without being anywhere near as temperamental as the original 289s or 427s found in the real deal. Still though, it’s a handful to drive. The ergonomics are true to the original, which is to say that ergonomics weren’t really a factor back then. But it all adds to the authentic experience. It’s just one more layer of sensory overload.

This is the kind of car you drive when you want to forget your problems, shirk off your responsibilities, and just cut loose for a while. Driving the Cobra is so engaging; you just don’t have time to focus on any of life’s nonsense. It’s just you and the car.

OVERVIEW

If you’ve ever wondered what it was like to drive a vintage, 1960’s race car, this is about as close as you’ll get. This Factory Five Racing (FFR) Mk III Cobra is about as visceral as it gets. Wind in your hair, bugs in your teeth, rocks pinging off the very loud exhaust pipes running down the side of the car, just inches from your left thigh. It’s a rough and tumble kind of car, built for the war heroes and tough guys that dared to try and tame it around a race track.

With this FFR kit though, it runs the more modern 5.0-liter engine that Vanilla Ice made famous in “Ice, Ice Baby”. Sure, it’s not 100% historically accurate, but it’s got plenty of juice to squeeze and without being anywhere near as temperamental as the original 289s or 427s found in the real deal. Still though, it’s a handful to drive. The ergonomics are true to the original, which is to say that ergonomics weren’t really a factor back then. But it all adds to the authentic experience. It’s just one more layer of sensory overload.

This is the kind of car you drive when you want to forget your problems, shirk off your responsibilities, and just cut loose for a while. Driving the Cobra is so engaging; you just don’t have time to focus on any of life’s nonsense. It’s just you and the car.

GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$450 PER DAY

BOOK NOW >

GET BEHIND THE WHEEL

$450 PER DAY

BOOK NOW >

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

Like a diamond in the rough, sometimes the best outcomes are created from humble beginnings. Forced to leave racing behind because of a health condition, Carroll Shelby was having a hard time finding a new place in the world. An entrepreneur and a car guy at heart, Shelby started wheeling and dealing until he found out that AC Motors was going to stop production on the Ace because the Bristol V6 used in the car was going out of production. Shelby, having ties to Ford, quickly hatched a plan to stuff the engine compartment of the Ace with a Ford-built 260-CID V8 engine instead, thereby creating the first Cobra.

It wasn’t long before Carroll Shelby and his small team of engineers and mechanics began stuffing bigger engines under the hood to see what would fit. After the 260 came the 289, followed eventually by a big-block 427-CID V8. It’s not hard to see how a lightweight sports car with a big American engine could make one heck of a sports car, and although just under 1,000 true Shelby Cobras were ever built between 1961 and 1968, it’s timeless and iconic design spawned tens of thousands of clones.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

Like a diamond in the rough, sometimes the best outcomes are created from humble beginnings. Forced to leave racing behind because of a health condition, Carroll Shelby was having a hard time finding a new place in the world. An entrepreneur and a car guy at heart, Shelby started wheeling and dealing until he found out that AC Motors was going to stop production on the Ace because the Bristol V6 used in the car was going out of production. Shelby, having ties to Ford, quickly hatched a plan to stuff the engine compartment of the Ace with a Ford-built 260-CID V8 engine instead, thereby creating the first Cobra.

It wasn’t long before Carroll Shelby and his small team of engineers and mechanics began stuffing bigger engines under the hood to see what would fit. After the 260 came the 289, followed eventually by a big-block 427-CID V8. It’s not hard to see how a lightweight sports car with a big American engine could make one heck of a sports car, and although just under 1,000 true Shelby Cobras were ever built between 1961 and 1968, it’s timeless and iconic design spawned tens of thousands of clones.

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VEHICLES OF ALL SHAPES &
SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

VIEW COLLECTION >