1965 Lincoln Continental 2017-06-08T10:29:35+00:00

Project Description

OVERVIEW

Swing open the big, heavy door and slide yourself onto the big, comfy bench seat. Looking out over the huge hood, it’s easy to focus on the small Lincoln emblem at the tip of the hood. It’s not exactly like staring down the sight on a rifle, but it gives you some sense of perspective on just how large this 1965 Continental is. Shockingly, the fourth generation Continental is a whole foot shorter than its predecessor! From behind the wheel, the big Lincoln has a commanding presence. You feel like a boss, a leader, a celebrity. And that’s largely because those were the kinds of people who bought these cars.

One of the Lincoln’s most standout features are its “suicide” rear doors that open the opposite way from the front doors. Surprisingly, this wasn’t just a party trick dreamt up by one of Lincoln’s engineers. Instead, it was a practical decision led by the fact that the engineers kept hitting their feet on conventional doors. They found that using rear-hinged doors made getting in and out of the Continental a far more graceful affair. Another trick feature for convertible models like this one was the power soft-top that was completely hidden away underneath the rear trunk lid when not in use. Watching the huge hydraulic solenoids and motors in action while the top goes down is endlessly fascinating. That being said, don’t expect much storage space in what looks like a huge trunk. With the top down, there’s barely enough room for a backpack or small duffel bag.

On the road, the sheer size of the Continental can seem unwieldy at first, but when you’re driving a car like this, people tend to get out of your way. As you’d expect from a huge, luxurious car such as the Continental, it glides down the road quite effortlessly. The suspension and long wheelbase to a great job of soaking up bumps make highway cruising relaxing and carefree. The big, lumbering 7.0-liter V8 feels adequate, allowing the Lincoln to ride a big wave of torque. As you might imagine, the Lincoln is far better at cruising on a lazy afternoon than it is storming down the road trying to cut through traffic. Regardless of how you drive it though, you’ll be doing it in absolute style.

OVERVIEW

Swing open the big, heavy door and slide yourself onto the big, comfy bench seat. Looking out over the huge hood, it’s easy to focus on the small Lincoln emblem at the tip of the hood. It’s not exactly like staring down the sight on a rifle, but it gives you some sense of perspective on just how large this 1965 Continental is. Shockingly, the fourth generation Continental is a whole foot shorter than its predecessor! From behind the wheel, the big Lincoln has a commanding presence. You feel like a boss, a leader, a celebrity. And that’s largely because those were the kinds of people who bought these cars.

One of the Lincoln’s most standout features are its “suicide” rear doors that open the opposite way from the front doors. Surprisingly, this wasn’t just a party trick dreamt up by one of Lincoln’s engineers. Instead, it was a practical decision led by the fact that the engineers kept hitting their feet on conventional doors. They found that using rear-hinged doors made getting in and out of the Continental a far more graceful affair. Another trick feature for convertible models like this one was the power soft-top that was completely hidden away underneath the rear trunk lid when not in use. Watching the huge hydraulic solenoids and motors in action while the top goes down is endlessly fascinating. That being said, don’t expect much storage space in what looks like a huge trunk. With the top down, there’s barely enough room for a backpack or small duffel bag.

On the road, the sheer size of the Continental can seem unwieldy at first, but when you’re driving a car like this, people tend to get out of your way. As you’d expect from a huge, luxurious car such as the Continental, it glides down the road quite effortlessly. The suspension and long wheelbase to a great job of soaking up bumps make highway cruising relaxing and carefree. The big, lumbering 7.0-liter V8 feels adequate, allowing the Lincoln to ride a big wave of torque. As you might imagine, the Lincoln is far better at cruising on a lazy afternoon than it is storming down the road trying to cut through traffic. Regardless of how you drive it though, you’ll be doing it in absolute style.

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$250 PER DAY

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A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Lincoln Continental is one of those historic nameplates that had an incredibly long run. Having started life in 1940, the Continental shared much in common with the iconic Zephyr, including its 4.8-liter V12 engine. When the Continental ended production in 1948, it was the last V12-powered car built in the US. Unfortunately, it took another eight years for Lincoln to produce another Continental model. This time, the 1956 Continental was apart of its own separate brand, removed from Ford. When it came out, it was at a price of $10,000, which rivaled the best of the best cars available, including Rolls Royce. The Continental became a halo car and test bed for the company. It was an engineer’s playground to design the best, most luxurious features they could come up with, and despite its price. Lincoln actually lost money on each Continental it produced. Continuing on with the engineering and design bonanza, the redesigned 1958 Continental became an icon for being one of the longest American cars ever built at just over 19 feet long.

For 1961, the fourth generation Continental was a return to classic styling, following a similar path to the Thunderbird at the time. In doing so, Lincoln managed to shorten the Continental by more than a foot, however it was still a massive car both in terms of length and mass. For 1966, the Continental received a redesign while also lowering the price by $600. Lincoln managed to do this without giving up any features as a way to lure buyers away from Cadillac. From a design standpoint, it was an immediate success and became a Hollywood icon. Later in life, it was featured in movies such as Goldfinger, The Matrix, Last Action Hero, Spider-Man 2, Hit and Run, Animal House, and Inspector Gadget. More recently, it also made appearances in TV shows such as Entourage and Vegas.

A LOOK IN THE REAR VIEW

The Lincoln Continental is one of those historic nameplates that had an incredibly long run. Having started life in 1940, the Continental shared much in common with the iconic Zephyr, including its 4.8-liter V12 engine. When the Continental ended production in 1948, it was the last V12-powered car built in the US. Unfortunately, it took another eight years for Lincoln to produce another Continental model. This time, the 1956 Continental was apart of its own separate brand, removed from Ford. When it came out, it was at a price of $10,000, which rivaled the best of the best cars available, including Rolls Royce. The Continental became a halo car and test bed for the company. It was an engineer’s playground to design the best, most luxurious features they could come up with, and despite its price. Lincoln actually lost money on each Continental it produced. Continuing on with the engineering and design bonanza, the redesigned 1958 Continental became an icon for being one of the longest American cars ever built at just over 19 feet long.

For 1961, the fourth generation Continental was a return to classic styling, following a similar path to the Thunderbird at the time. In doing so, Lincoln managed to shorten the Continental by more than a foot, however it was still a massive car both in terms of length and mass. For 1966, the Continental received a redesign while also lowering the price by $600. Lincoln managed to do this without giving up any features as a way to lure buyers away from Cadillac. From a design standpoint, it was an immediate success and became a Hollywood icon. Later in life, it was featured in movies such as Goldfinger, The Matrix, Last Action Hero, Spider-Man 2, Hit and Run, Animal House, and Inspector Gadget. More recently, it also made appearances in TV shows such as Entourage and Vegas.

WORD ON THE STREET

“I just loved the thought of four to six friends in the car, heading out to a party on Friday night and loved the fact that occupants could step out of the back by opening the door rearward. I wanted to take my best girl to the drive-in movies and really wanted to know what it felt like to do a donut in a nearly 20-foot car.”

Jake Lingeman, Autoweek

“One of the plushest wolftraps on the road. It’s as quiet as the love life of a bass, and it rides as smooth as spilt fudge on a canted stove. [Its] looks will equal any car’s in the nation and, in the opinion of some of my arty friends, will trim all others six ways from the post and twice on Sunday.”

Tom McCahill, Mechanix Illustrated

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SIZES, PERFECT FOR
ANY OCCASION

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